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September 2, 2009 04:26 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Brian Sansoni, 202-662-2517 / 202-680-9327 or bsansoni@cleaning101.com

Survey: Two-Thirds of Americans Concerned About H1N1, But Most Don’t Change Hygiene Habits

  • 93% of Adults Surveyed Believe Good Hygiene Will Help Avoid Spread of Flu
     
  • 68% Report H1N1 Has Not Led to Change in Cleaning Habits
     
  • Only 8% Say They Clean Hands More Often; Just 4% Clean Surfaces More

Summary/Key Findings

WASHINGTON, D.C., September 2, 2009 – The good news: Americans recognize that good hygiene is an effective line of defense against the H1N1 virus (previously known as Swine Flu).

The bad news: the awareness has not driven a change in how frequently people wash their hands or clean surfaces that they touch all the time, which are important, effective behaviors for avoiding the flu.

In a nationwide survey of 888 adults conducted on behalf of The Soap and Detergent Association (SDA - www.cleaninginstitute.org), respondents were asked about their level of concern about the virus; how that concern has changed their hygiene habits; and whether they believed implementing steps such as good hygiene can help avoid the spread of H1N1 (the survey was conducted by Echo Research from August 6-9, 2009). Among the key survey findings:

  • Nearly two-thirds of households surveyed (65%) expressed concern about H1N1 flu (women more than men: 72%, 57%, respectively).
     
  • More than nine out of ten (93%) believe that steps such as good hygiene will help limit its spread.
     
  • Only one-third of respondents said they changed their overall hygiene habits in response to the growing concerns about H1N1.
     

Health authorities, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the World Health Organization (WHO), say that the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus is the predominant influenza virus in circulation worldwide. Consequently, CDC states that H1N1 poses the potential to cause significant illness with associated hospitalizations and deaths during the U.S. influenza season.

"Simple but effective, everyday practices can help protect public health and guard against colds, flu and the H1N1 virus," said Nancy Bock, SDA Vice President of Education.

"We can combat H1N1 at home, in schools and the workplace if everyone does their part. Preventative health care is literally in our hands. Common sense hand hygiene and surface cleaning and disinfection practices will play an important role this year during the cold and flu season to help keep people healthy."

SDA recommends taking the following steps at home, work and school:

  • Washing hands with soap for a minimum of 15-20 seconds routinely, particularly after coughing, sneezing, using the restroom and before eating meals.
     
  • Having all family members carry a portable hand sanitizer product when access to soap and water is potentially inaccessible.
     
  • Routinely cleaning and disinfecting home and office surfaces, including countertops, desks, keyboards, telephones and doorknobs and handles.
     

A total of 888 American adults (446 men and 442 women) were surveyed August 6-9, 2009, on behalf of SDA, by Echo Research. The survey has a margin of error of +/- 3.4 percent. A summary of the findings will be available at www.cleaninginstitute.org/news/h1n1_survey_summary.aspx .


The 2009 National Spring Cleaning Survey was completed for The Soap and Detergent Association by Echo Research, Inc. Echo questioned 1,002 American adults (501 men and 501 women) via telephone on February 13-16, 2009. The survey has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.2 percent. A summary of the survey results will be available on SDA’s website at www.cleaninginstitute.org/news

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The Soap and Detergent Association (www.cleaninginstitute.org), the Home of the U.S. Cleaning Products Industry®, represents the $30 billion U.S. cleaning products market. SDA members include the formulators of soaps, detergents, and general cleaning products used in household, commercial, industrial and institutional settings; companies that supply ingredients and finished packaging for these products; and oleochemical producers. SDA and its members are dedicated to improving health and the quality of life through sustainable cleaning products and practices.