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 CPISI Frequently Asked Questions

How was hazard data for each cleaning product ingredient identified?

How can I learn more about the ACI Identification of Hazard Datasets?

How were exposure assessments determined for each cleaning product ingredient?

How was the ACI Ingredient Inventory developed?

How can I learn more about the ACI Ingredient Inventory?

What is the next step in the Cleaning Product Ingredient Safety Initiative?

Why can’t I find the name for an ingredient on the Inventory?

How can I learn more about the ACI Compilation of Exposure Assessments?

 What are NOAELs, LOAELs, ED50s and LD50s?

 What is a Risk Characterization Ratio, or RCR?

Development of the CPISI Ingredient Inventory

What is the ACI Ingredient Inventory?

The Ingredient Inventory is a comprehensive list of uniquely identified ingredients used by ACI members to manufacture dish care, laundry care, and hard surface cleaning products.

How was the ACI Ingredient Inventory developed?

The Ingredient Inventory was compiled from information on over 900 consumer cleaning products manufactured by ACI members participating in the Consumer Product Ingredient Communication Initiative. Ingredients are listed here using a unique chemical name or trade name followed by one or more Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) Registry Numbers where these are available. One will note that the Inventory contains many fragrance-related ingredients, but it is not necessarily comprehensive in listing fragrances used in cleaning products. A comprehensive list of fragrance ingredients used in a wide variety of products including cleaning products may be found in a similar inventory compiled by the International Fragrance Association. For more detailed information regarding our collection methodology, please see our ACI Ingredient Inventory Collection Methodology Document.

How can I learn more about the ACI Ingredient Inventory?

The Ingredient Inventory is the first step in ACI’s Cleaning Product Ingredient Safety Initiative, which is an ongoing effort to provide easier access to human health and environmental safety data for the chemical ingredients used in consumer cleaning products manufactured by ACI members. For more information regarding the ACI Ingredient Inventory,  you may contact ACI directly by completing the Contact Us form.

What is the next step in the Cleaning Product Ingredient Safety Initiative?

The next step in the project was to identify publicly available human health hazard data relevant to each ingredient that was identified. ACI has published the available hazard data associated with each of the ingredients listed in the Ingredient Inventory as part of a consolidated Identification of Hazard Datasets Inventory.

Why can’t I find the name for an ingredient on the Inventory?

There are many different naming conventions that can be used to refer to the same ingredient. To compile the Inventory, multiple names for the same ingredient were often consolidated; also, names that were general were related to more specific sets of ingredients. If the name of the ingredient you are looking for does not appear below, you can access the Ingredient Naming Translator. The Translator lists all of the possible naming conventions for an ingredient that were encountered in the survey of products and identifies the standardized names or names associated with it. 

Development of the Hazard Data Portal

How was hazard data for each cleaning product ingredient identified?

Hazard data for each cleaning product ingredient in the Inventory were identified to create a database that contains links to publicly accessible data. Chemical hazard data for each unique ingredient was found through a number of online sources and databases. The primary data sources searched included Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) Registration dossiers, U. S. EPA’s High Production Volume Information System (HPVIS), Human and Environmental Risk Assessment (HERA) reports, the Results of Categorization of the Canadian Domestic Substances List, and Japan’s Chemicals Collaborative Knowledge (J-CHECK) database. For more detail regarding our hazard data identification methodology, please see the ACI Identification of Hazard Datasets Methodology Document.

How can I learn more about the ACI Identification of Hazard Datasets?

This effort supports the long term goal of the CPISI project to conduct exposure assessments and screening-level risk assessments to describe the safe use of every ingredient used in consumer cleaning products manufactured by ACI members. For more information regarding the ACI Identification of Hazard Datasets, please see the ACI Identification of Hazard Datasets Methodology Document or you may contact ACI by completing the Contact Us form.

Development of the Exposure Assessments

How were exposure assessments determined for each cleaning product ingredient?

The goal of this phase of the CPISI was the characterization of exposure for each ingredient, in the framework of the product types and their typical applications. Exposure modeling focused on the ingredients examined in the Ingredient Inventory, their chemical composition, the product types each ingredient is found in, their intended function(s), and data from surveys of habits and practices for the use of these products. For a description of all functions, please see the ACI Glossary of Functional Classes. This data was gathered during the compilation of the inventory in order to support the development of exposure assessments for each substance.

For more detail regarding our exposure assessment methodology, please see the ACI Compilation of Exposure Assessments Methodology Document.

How can I learn more about the ACI Compilation of Exposure Assessments?

Compilation of the exposure assessments for the cleaning product ingredients was the third step in ACI’s CPISI which is an ongoing effort to provide easier access to human health and environmental safety data for the chemical ingredients used in consumer cleaning products manufactured by ACI members. This effort supports the long term goal of the CPISI project to conduct screening-level risk assessment to describe the safe use of every ingredient. For more information regarding the ACI Compilation of Exposure Assessments, you may contact ACI directly by completing the Contact Us form.

Development of the Screening-level Risk Assessments

What are NOAELs, LOAELs, ED50s and LD50s?

Hazard information is often expressed in terms of levels of effect reported from scientific studies on test subjects or organisms. The No Observed Adverse Effect Level (NOAEL) is a dose at which no effect was observed. The Lowest Observed Adverse Effect Level (LOAEL) is the lowest dose at which a specific effect was observed. The "Lethal Dose-50" is the dose at which 50% of test organisms died, while the "Effects Dose-50" is the dose at which 50% of test organisms showed the specified effect.

What is a Risk Characterization Ratio, or RCR?

The RCR is a means of expressing risk. It is calculated by dividing the estimated exposure to an ingredient by a hazard value. In the case of the screening level risk assessments performed as part of CPISI, the RCR is calculated by dividing the total aggregate dose by a NOAEL value. An RCR below 1 indicates that a risk is unlikely because exposures are less than a dose known to produce no effect. An RCR above 1 indicates that there may be a potential for risk because exposures are higher than no effects levels. That said, RCR calculated as part of CPISI are highly conservative and thus may overestimate the potential for risk.

 

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