Search:
News Masthead
 
 
January 24, 2013 10:44 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Brian Sansoni, 202-662-2517 (office) / 202-680-9327 (mobile) or via email at bsansoni@cleaninginstitute.org


ACI: Research, Reports on Antibacterial Ingredient Distorted

  • ACI: Triclosan Among the Most Reviewed and Researched Consumer Product Ingredients
  • Antibacterial Products, Ingredients Have a Long Track Record of Safety, Effectiveness


WASHINGTON, DC, January 24, 2013: Analyses of research finding extremely low levels of an antibacterial ingredient in waterways are completely distorting facts about its safety and effectiveness, according to the American Cleaning Institute (ACI – www.cleaninginstitute.org).

Researchers in Minnesota published a paper that describes their finding of the ingredient triclosan in some of the state’s waterways. Unfortunately, says ACI, the researchers’ publicity efforts promoting their paper – implying safety concerns about triclosan – are just not borne out by the overall body of research on triclosan. Triclosan is one of the most researched and reviewed chemicals used in health care and consumer products.

"We would commend the researchers for being able to find vanishingly low levels of chemicals in the environment, but point out they ignore that there are no negative impacts associated with those trace compounds in the environment," said Dr. Paul DeLeo, ACI Senior Director of Environmental Safety.
Their statement that "We know that, since 1965, triclosan is the major source of dioxins in all these lakes," is completely misleading, according to ACI.

"While it is true that triclosan was invented in the mid-1960s, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) did not issue its first proposed Over-the-Counter (OTC) drug monograph allowing for the ingredient to be used and marketed in antimicrobial washes until 1978," said DeLeo. "Furthermore, soap companies did not mass market consumer antimicrobial products containing triclosan until 1989. Moreover, the FDA did not approve triclosan to be used in dentifrices until the mid to late 1990s."

Antibacterial hand wash products containing triclosan are regulated in the U.S. by the FDA as OTC drug products and provide a key public health benefit by reducing or eliminating pathogenic bacteria on the skin to a significantly greater degree than plain soap and water.

Triclosan and products containing it have been scrutinized by a number of governmental bodies around the world. It has a long track record of human and environmental safety which is supported by a multitude of science-based, transparent risk analyses. Currently, FDA and Health Canada have publicly indicated that that triclosan does not harm human health.

Some media reports on the new research have talked about antibiotics being found in Minnesota waterways. There are no antibiotics in soaps and cosmetics. Triclosan is not an antibiotic.

"We are deeply concerned about the recent proliferation of biased and inaccurate information being reported on triclosan," said Dr. DeLeo. "Our overriding concern is the safety of those who use our products. Families can continue to use antibacterial soaps and hygiene products with confidence and use them in everyday situations.

"These products are safe, effective and they do what they say they do: kill germs that can make us sick."

You can find more information on the science and safety of antibacterial products online at www.cleaninginstitute.org/antibacterials/ and www.FightGermsNow.com.

###

The American Cleaning Institute® (ACI) is the Home of the U.S. Cleaning Products Industry® and represents the $30 billion U.S. cleaning products market. ACI members include the formulators of soaps, detergents, and general cleaning products used in household, commercial, industrial and institutional settings; companies that supply ingredients and finished packaging for these products; and oleochemical producers. ACI (www.cleaninginstitute.org) and its members are dedicated to improving health and the quality of life through sustainable cleaning products and practices.